Urgent – Help required

Appeal for help

Bank account details of Sindhu are given at the end

Received the following email from P.G.Stalin ‘sir, please help the Badaga family suffering in the GH, Coimbatore in nephrology ward. the poor girl is all alone and is taking care of her father. Philanthropic people of our community please help the family. very urgent’

I spoke to the girl SINDHU – 9688031644 who mentioned that she is from HULLATHATTI, near Beraganni and her father’s both kindneys have failed. Her mother has also been operated. Because of the climate and proximity to GH Coimbatore, they have rented a house in Mettupalayam. She is getting about Rs.5000/- per month and there is no other income. She finds it very difficult to take her father for dialysis every week as she is not able to get leave from her work place.

In response -Sivakumar.B, Muckimalai   wrote:- SIR, AS OF NOW, I WANT TO PUT Rs. 200/- PM AS A LITTLE CONTRIBUTION. WHAT IS THE MODE OF PAYMENT?

Dear Sivakumar – it is so nice of you to offer monetary help. We have put in Rs.5000/ – to be handed over to Sindhu. I just spoke to her and understand that she is in the process of opening a bank account. I will let you know the details ASAP.

Update : 4-7-14 : Spoke to Sindhu again and learnt that her father is only 45 years old. Her mother was operated recently but complications have set in as her stomach is filled with water. Sindhu, is the only child

To all those kind hearted souls, pl donate liberally to help a family that needs urgent attention. – Wg Cdr.JP

************************************************

Update 10-7-14

Sindhu’s bank account details are :

Bank: CORPORATION BANK
Branch : METTUPALAYAM
IFSC Code: CORP0000016
Account No : 001600101021908
Name : M.SINDHU

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Do not lose a piece of paradise called the Nilgiris / Nakku Betta

cropped-landscape-b.jpg

Yes, it is highly tempting to sell our land [mostly planted with tea] due to the unbelievable prices offered by outsiders, the so called ‘Bombay Buyers’ as claimed by the brokers -many of whom are, believe it or not, Badagas.

But have you given a thought why ‘they’ are buying land in the Nilgiris, Nakku Betta?

The beauty, clean air and the feeling of living with the Nature – in short our land as handed down to us by our ancestors is nothing but a piece of paradise on earth.

Even if we have to sell our property, please make sure that you retain atleast a small portion to build a house and enough land for a ‘hola – vegetable garden’.

Remember, if you sell your land today, it is going to be impossible to buy any land in the Nilgiris in future for the prices are going to be very high.

mtp-view2-copy.jpg

[photos by Wg Cdr JP]

The one stop website of/for Badagas

Landscape bbadaga.co

and

baduga.co

will to take you to our website

BADAGAS OF THE BLUE MOUNTAINS

the one stop destination to know everything about BADAGA

Badaga Proverbs – Doddaru SHLOKA

Badaga Proverbs – Doddaru SHLOKA

One of the fascinating and interesting aspects of Badaga [both people & language] is the free use of delightful but deep meaning proverbs called “ DODDARU SHLOKA”. When you engage an elderly Badaga into any conversation, you are sure to hear a lot of these proverbs thrown in to make / emphasis a point.

Prof. Paul Hockings, probably the most authentic researcher on and of Badaga lists more than a thousand Badaga proverbs, 1730 to be precise. May be he had extensively borrowed these from the unpublished manuscript of M.K.Bellie Gowder. He feels that 1730 could be a complete figure containing all the proverbs . See his book,’Counsel from the Ancients: Study of Badaga Proverbs, Prayers, Omens and Curses’. He has given the meaning in English as well thus making it easy to understand in a beautiful manner.

Though I find his collection extremely interesting and educative, I do not agree with some of the conclusions he draws on certain proverbs. For example, on the proverb, ‘Odhidhama Niddhana, Oddidhama Erandina’ .

Prof.Hockings interpretation is quite different to what I feel is the correct meaning. I think ‘a person who spends time learning and pondering (over a problem) is better than the one who runs away (in a hurry) and thus trips over. [Odhidhama – learned one , Niddhana – stops to ponder over[think] a problem, Oddidhama – one who runs away or is in a hurry, Erandina – trips over.

It is common practice for Badaga mothers to tell their young children ‘Oda beda , Erandiray’ – Donot run, you will trip over (a stone or any obstruction). That is ‘ do not be in a hurry and take a hasty decision’.

Another one is ‘Michidhavaga Morande Kolu Bangara’. The lady who does not listen to her husband /any one (Michidha Hemmathi) is bound to land up as a widow (when ‘Morande Kolu – a small stick of morende tree – replaces her jewellery [bangara] – nose ring and ear rings during the Ole Kattuva ritual of husband’s death / funeral ceremony). Prof.Hockings feels Mechidhavaga (see the difference between michidhava – one who does not listen- and mechidhava – one who is appreciated by all – even a morende kolu is enough as jewellery.

Actual proverb could have been, ‘Michi dhavaga Moranday kolu Bangara, Mechi dhavaga Morenday Kolu Singara’

Is it a case of beautiful wordplay (pun) by our ancestors??

I have listed a few of the proverbs here, or….….read more here

Rare Photos

'''Topographic map of Nilgiri Hills showing so...

Image via Wikipedia

On the unique BADAGA community of the Nilgiris in Southern India…their origin, language, culture and customs !!

Website of Wing commander Bellie Jayaprakash that is regularly updated and more info added

The following photos are from Thurston’s Book “Castes and Tribes of South India” published in 1909 by Government of India Press, Madras

Badaga Temple

Badaga Temple – This must be one of the oldest Badaga temples as the photo was published in 1909. The deity of this temple? Also, notice the elephant, horse and the snake on the outer wall. Any guess as to where this temple is located??

Madivale

Madivale

Badaga girls in 1909 or earlier

Badaga girls in 1909 or earlier. At first glance it appears as those these girls are wearing ‘pattu – head gear’.Take a closer look, their heads have been partially shaved. Did this signify any particular custom or period in the lives of these very young girls. No info available in Thurston’s book

Fire Making by Badagas -1909

See more here

Badaga Funeral Rites

Many a time, when we realize that some of our elders and educated have felt the need to put our old customs, traditions, rites etc on record – be it a manuscript or a printed booklet, it becomes a source of reference for many generations that follow.

I had the good fortune of reproducing the ‘Hethe Amma History’ by Naduhatti Bogga Mada Gowder published in 1925 [see the page on HETHE] and now the ‘ SAAVU HARAKKE -Funeral Prayer’ originally complied and published by Ketti -Achenekal M.Kala Gowder on 25-9-1944 and reproduced by M.K.Nanja Gowder [ see below the 8th edition]. He had been gracious to acknowledge the support extended by Rao Bahadur H.B.Ari Gowder’s family in his effort.

It is important to mention that Ketti Achenekal Mr.M.K.Nanja Gowder’s manuscipts have been extensively quoted by many researchers including Prof.Paul Hockings.

Karu Arachodhu 1
Karu Harachodhu 2
Karu Harachodhu 3 Karu Harachodhu 4

For more on BADAGA FUNERAL RITES go here or here

Proud to say we got 300,000 hits !

WP Hits

Extremely grateful to one and all for ‘HITTING’ us 300,000 times.

This landmark was reached on – 6th January, 2014 !!

Thanks again for the new year gift !!!

Uri Hogi, Siri Barali

Oh Man…

Here’s a question that was posed to the Dalai Lama: “What thing about humanity surprises you the most?”

His answer is : “MAN – Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices his money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he doesn’t enjoy the present,

And as a result he doesn’t live in the present or the future. And he lives as if he’s never going to die and then he dies having never really lived”.

Is it NOT true with every Badaga-  male or female?

Badaga Proverb – Dhoddaru SHLOKA

DHoddaru SHLOKA

One of the fascinating and interesting aspect of Badaga [both people & language] is the free use of delightful but deep meaning proverbs called “DHODDARU SHLOKA”. Also we can call it – “DHODDAVAKKA HEGIDHADHU [What the Elders said] or “MUTHAPPANA MAATHU [Ancestors Words].When you engage an elderly Badaga into any conversation, you are sure to hear a lot of these proverbs thrown in to make / emphasis a point.

Prof. Paul Hockings, probably the most authentic researcher on and of Badaga lists more than a thousand Badaga proverbs, 1730 to be precise. He feels that 1730 could be a complete figure containing all the proverbs there are. See his book,’Counsel from the Ancients: Study of Badaga Proverbs, Prayers, Omens and Curses’. He has given the meaning in English as well as making it easy to understand, in a beautiful manner.

Though I find his collection extremely interesting and educative, I do not agree with some of the conclusions he draws on certain proverbs. For example, on the proverb, ‘Odhidhama Niddhana, Oddidhama Erandina’ Prof.Hockings interpretation is quite different to what I feel is the correct meaning. I think ‘a person who spends time learning and ponders (over a problem) is better than the one who runs away (in a hurry) and thus trips over. [Odhidhama – one who has learnt (spent time learning), Niddhana – stops to ponder over[think], Oddidhama – one who runs, Erandina – trips over]. We can hear mothers telling their young children ‘Oda beda , Erandire’ – Donot run, you will trip over (a stone or any obstruction). That is ‘ do not be in a hurry and take a hasty decision’.


Another one is ‘Michidhavaga Morande Kolu Bangara’. In my opinion . the lady who does not listen to any one (Michidha Hemmathi) is bound to land up as a widow (when ‘Morande Kolu – a small stick of morende tree – replaces her jewellery (bangara) during the Ole Kattuva ritual of husband’s death / funeral ceremony). Prof.Hockings feels Mechidhavaga (see the difference between michidhava – one who does not listen- and mechidhava – one who is appreciated by all – even a morende kolu is enough as jewellery. Is it a case of wordplay (pun) by our ancestors??

Visit the website Badaga Proverbs for more interesting information

Badaga In English Script – Qwerty key pad

Badaga In English Script – Qwerty key pad

It is fantastic that a lot of efforts are being made to develop a Badaga script by Kadasoley Yogesh, Anandha Raju, Saravana Kumar Raju and others. Each has a different script to offer.

Meanwhile, I feel, it may be possible to use English alphabet and special characters that are available in a standard ‘QWERTY key pad’ to ‘write Badagu’.

The special characters are used since we do not have equivalent English letters for some letters like La – ள, Na – ண ,  etc.

Special character like [colon] : is used to avoid writing ‘a’ twice in many words like ‘baalu – tail’.

See the examples below :-

a:du - ஆடு, Dance, sheep/Goat
[a:tta a:duva b:a - ஆட்ட ஆடுவ பா  - come, let us dance],

[kappu a:du dh:aradhu? -கப்பு ஆடு தாரது  whose black sheep is that?]

idhu adhu – இது அது – this and that

k:angi – காங்கி [Female] Name
[K:angi yu Gangi yu hola gelachcha ga hogi d:arey - காங்கி யு கங்கி யு ஹோல  கெல்ச்ச க ஹோகி தாரெ - Kaangi and Gangi have gone to work in the field]

g:ai – காய் -Wind
[baniyanu ikku, g:ai beesira - பனியனு இக்கு காய் பீசிர - wear (woolen) sweater, it is windy]

bal’l’ey - பள்ளே – flat footed woman
[ah bal'l'eya kan'n'u holla - அ பள்ளே ய கண்ணு ஹொல்ல - That flat footed woman's eyes are full of evil]

k^oi – கோய் -chicken
[k^oi udhakka - கோய் உதக்க - chicken curry]

kodu -   கொடு -give
[S^omi, ee koosuga budhiya kodu - சோமி , ஈ கூசுக புத்தி ய கொடு - God, give this boy some wisdom]

k^odu – கோடு – line
[k^oda th:anda beda - கோட தாண்ட பேட - don't cross the line]

ban’n’a – பண்ண – colour
[ban'n'a battey baekku - பண்ண  பட்டே பேக்கு - need colourful cloth]

hen’n’u – ஹெண்ணு – girl
[ah hen'n'u s^okka idhdhavey - அ ஹெண்ணு சோக்க இத்தவெ - that girl looks beautiful]

kan’n’u – கண்ணு – eye
k:an’u – காணு see
[kan'n'a tharadhu k:an'u  endhu haegu - கண்ண தரது காணு எந்து ஹேகு - ask (him/her) to open the eyes and see]

hal’l’a – ஹள்ள – river
[hal'l'adha neeru kammi - ஹள்ள த நீரு கம்மி - less water in the river]

halla – ஹல்ல – man with big teeth
[hallajja na namba koodadhu - ஹல்லஜ்ஜன நம்ப கூடாது - don't believe that 'toothy' man]

a:lu – ஆலு – anger
[appa a:l endhundu edhdhaney - அப்ப ஆல் எந்துண்டு இத்தனெ - Father is very angry]

h:al’u – ஹாளு – cursed
[h:aluvadha h:alu k:arana innu k:an'ey - ஹாளுவாத ஹாலு காரன இன்னு காணே - that cursed milkman is not seen still]

bella - பெல்ல – jagiri [black sugar]
Bel’l’a – பெள்ள – male name
[Bel'l'a na m:aththu bella m:akkey - பெள்ளன மாத்து பெல்ல மாக்கே - Bella's words are sweet like black sugar]

Bel’l’ie – பெள்ளி – silver, Male name
[Bel'l'ie j^odi bel'l'i ungara ikki dhaney - பெள்ளி ஜோடி பெள்ளி உங்கர இக்கிதனெ - Bellie is wearing a pair of silver rings]

[Bel'l'anu Bel'l'ie yu appara nattu k:araru - பெள்ளனு பெள்ளியு  அப்பர நட்டு காரரு - Bella and Bellie are very friendly]

What are your views? Please send them as comments.

                 Script for Badaga      by   Dr.R.K.Haldorai

  “We can easily invent a completely new script for any language in a couple of days” (THE HINDU, May 25, 2013)

       Badaga language has to get a script. Few Badaga enthusiasts tried for that. Over the years few scripts were postulated. But one thing is sure that popularise any new script seems impossible in the present social scenario.

      A language can potentially be written in any script of the world with some minor changes. Badaga language is studied by well known scholars. These linguistic scholars employed other languages’ scripts, especially Tamil and Roman (English) for Badaga language. They followed the internationally adopted methods. When we follow these things we are spared from two great hurdles. Tamil and English letters are known to the present educated Badagas. So, comparatively it is very easy to popularise the required letters. Next it will be in consonance with the international studies. In this background Linguists always favour to adopt the vernacular known scripts for unlettered languages.

    It is to be remembered that the Kodagu language is written in Kannada script. In the same way another south Indian Dravidian language Tulu adopted Kannada script long ago. It is not new that more than one language adopted a common script. It is a worldwide scenario. In India Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathy, and Nepali are written in Deva Nagari script. Of late Kongany which elevated to the eight schedule of our constitution too, adopted Deva Nagari. An unlettered Naaga language of the north east state adopted Roman letters.

     To make Badaga a lettered language, Tamil and Roman scripts are at our hand.

Badaga Origin

This article is reproduced due to readers request

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Many mistakenly claim that Badaga Origin is nothing but Badaga migration from Mysore  [now in Karnataka state] during Tipu’s time only because of  the name Badaga (meaning northerner). It is very debatable. Unfortunately many Badagas have believed it in the absence of any convincing and conclusive evidence to the contrary. But the latest revelations and links about the language, especially from the epics and writings during the Tamil Sangam period tell a totally different story (see below).

Portrait of Tipu Sultan once owned by Richard ...

I am firmly of the view that our history is much older- may be a thousand years or more older – and my initial ‘research’ confirms that. There is a lot written about the migration from Mysore theory by many anthropologists, researchers and others. For obvious reasons, most of them are/were ‘outsiders’ – like the early European missionaries and British. The one person who has done a lot to highlight about Badagas, in 1960s, Prof.Paul Hockings has chosen to go along with his predecessors in concluding that since Badaga means north[ner], they have migrated from southern  Mysore  during Tipu Sultan’s rule over Mysore to avoid being forcibly converted to Islam. Also sited in support of migration is the resemblance/similarity of Badaga (language) to Haleya [old] Kannada.

But, B.Balasubramaniam, a highly educated Badaga, in his book“ Paamé ” – The history and culture of the Badagas of the Nilgiris, feels that Badagas migrated from Southern Karnataka [then Mysore State] about 700 years back, much before Tipu’s time, around 1311 AD during the plundering raid of Malik Kafir.

  I am, also, firmly of the view that it is possible that Badagas have lived in the Nilgiris for thousand of years like the Thodas [Thodhamaru ] or Kothas [Kotharu] and migration theory is an attempt by historians and anthropologists to explain away a ‘historical puzzle’.  The mystery of migration needs to be solved once and for all.

What we DO NOT know about Badagas is more than what we know about them. Such is the mystery of Badaga Origin. Read the complete article here

A letter from Prof.Paul Hockings

As I have mentioned elsewhere, Prof.Paul Hockings should be credited for doing a lot of research on Badagas [and Nilgiris]. He has published many books on both. Though priced on the higher side, his book ‘ A Badaga – English Dictionary’ written along with Raichoor is a must read for all Badagas.

badengdic.jpg

(See the page on Research for more)

So, it was a pleasant surprise to receive an email from him informing about his new books.

paul2.jpg
Dear Wing-Commander,
I have just finished writing a new book on the Badagas, “So Long a Saga“, which is a 400-page book on the social history of the Badagas from 1565 to 2012. ….[the book may take some time to be published and released- Wg Cdr JP]
I also attach a notice about my other recent book, “Encyclopaedia of the Nilgiri Hills“.
With best wishes,
Paul Hockings
PHnew

The NEGLECTED half

Pedhdhuva 012

The NEGLECTED half [part -1]

 

 

We may be proud of many of our Traditions – note the capital T – that we have followed for thousand of years. I repeat thousand of years though some so called foreign researchers along with many ‘yours truly types’ among us, would give only a few hundred years to Badaga history.

One such tradition, call it a custom if you want, that needs immediate attention is how we treat our WOMEN.

I am a staunch devotee of Hethe(y) Amma and very proud about the fact that Hethe(y) Habba is the ‘mother’ of all festivals for Badagas. But, let us face it. We call ourselves ‘Hethe(y) Makka’ – the children of Goddess Hethe(y).  And we very fiercely follow the strict customs associated with Hethe(y) Habba.

But alas, at the same time, our women are side lined and given only a secondary position in many of the rituals associated with this great and grand festival.

I have discussed about this aspect with many Badagas, including some from Beraganni and Pedhuva – “when we are so devotional to a deity that is personified in the purest female form called HETHE(Y), why are we NOT allowing our womenfolk who form half our population to participate in some of the rituals of Hethe(y) Habba?”

There are no clear answers. We cannot live in isolation.

Traditions need not be changed for the sake of change but surely, by involving the other half of our population in a much more ‘inclusive’ way instead of ‘rash restrictions’, will we not enhance our name and fame as a community that is forward looking?

If we do not change with times and be part of the larger society that encompasses the entire country, then, we will be condemned to face the serious and severe consequences.

May Hethe(y) bless us with the wisdom.

[To be continued ...in 'Part- 2' we will see the injustice done to our women]

Set your mood to these songs…

Set your mood to these songs…

Badagas have made singing and dancing an integral part of their lives.

A happy occasion like a habba [festival] or marriage….there you go….to the foot tapping ATTA – Dance songs like ‘Meley Keriyoge – On the top street‘….even a non dancer will get the inspiration to let the hair loose and join the crowd….
A sad situation….like the demise of a departed dear one…..the sad ‘saavu – death’ songs of Kerban Bella Gowder or Thangadu Krishna Gowder like ‘Ganjikke Kukkeya...’ will make tears roll down the cheeks as they remind you of some one who is no more…
The ever green…Hethe Songs…..
Melodies with a message like ‘Manesella Nondhara – ‘
Or, the melodious modern Badaga songs where the instrumental music has been given more importance…
Or, listen to the powerful ‘Badaga Funeral Prayer – Karu Harachodhu [Blessing the calf]…the famous group rendering of ‘AATHIKKODHU

Listen to some of these ‘best of the best songs and sounds’ chosen by me by clicking on the links or ON SOUNDCLOUD given below…
Must see the website on Badaga Songs

Image

Kootu [Meeting] at Hubbathalai

Kootu [Meeting] at Hubbathalai

Click on the pix to see Rare Photos of Badagas

Badaga – is a separate language by itself

Badaga – is a separate language by itself

I have been steadfastly claiming that Badaga is an unique language by itself and not a derivative of any other Dravidian Language – I WILL WRITE MORE ON THE FOLLOWING SOON – Wg Cdr JP

Badaga language not a dialect of Kannada, claims French linguistic scholar

Shanta Thiagarajan, [Times of India] Dec 4, 2012,

UDHAGAMANDALAM: “The Badaga language, widely believed to be a dialect of Kannada, was the language of communication of ancient South Dravidians and shares similarities with the local Alu Kurumba tongue,” said Christiane Pilot-Raichoor, a linguistic French scholar from LACITO, a scientific research centre in Paris. She was in town recently to do some research work.

“Today, it is recognized as a separate language,” said Pilot-Raichoor, who has been working on the linguistic heritage of the Badaga language for the past two decades. According to her, there are too many important differences in the phonology and the grammar, differences in gender system, case system, verb classes, to claim a genetic relationship between Kannada and Badaga languages.

“Once our minds are freed from the idea that Badaga is a dialect of Kannada, it may become possible to consider more objectively the Alu Kurumba-Badaga linguistic relationship,” she said. Alu Kurumba shares most of the characteristic Nilgiri features including verb peculiarities of Badaga language. “Whatever resemblance it has to Kannada points to early medieval and older forms of the language. The core grammar in the Badaga language converges with other Nilgiris languages which can be traced to early south Dravidian features,” she explained. Continue reading

Rao Bahadur Ari Gowder

To day, 4-12-2012, is the 120th birthday anniversary of one of the greatest sons of Badaga Community,

Rao Bahadur HB Ari Gowder.

For all that he has done for the community, let us remember him with respect and gratitude !

My sincere salutations to the great and reputed man of Badaga community.
 
“To be born as a gentleman is an accident..
To live as one is an achievement…”
 
He has lived and achieved. Every badaga should feel proud of him.
He will be living eternally in the hearts of  all of us.
 
Regards,
kethorai rajma

 

Badaga leader’s birth anniversary celebrated

The Hindu – Udhagamandalam, December 5, 2012

Badagas celebrated the 119th birth anniversary of H.B. Ari Gowder at the Nilgiris Cooperative Marketing Society (NCMS), off the Government Botanical Garden Road, here, on Tuesday.

Long considered as the uncrowned king of the Badagas, Mr. Gowder was born on December 4, 1893 and died on June 28, 1971. He hailed from Hubbathalai village near Aruvankadu

The head of the Thodhanadu Seemai Badaga Welfare Association T.M. Kulla Gowder recalled that Mr. Ari Gowder was a well known philanthropist, who was respected by not only the Badagas but also others. He was instrumental in the NCMS coming into being in the 1930s to protect farmers from middlemen and unscrupulous traders in the plains.

For over three decades he was its president and for long it was considered as one of the best of its kind.

By way of acknowledging his significant contribution his bust was unveiled on May 25, 1987, in the multi-purpose hall of the NCMS.

The ‘Warisu’ card …..

It is unfortunate but true. There are still a lot of ‘greedy’ Badagas who feel that ‘all  property’ should go ONLY to a son / sons and and not to the daughter/daughters. These people, many of them- ‘educated idiots’ of both genders, would justify their claim and contention by saying only a son CAN be warisu or heir. Needless to say, they are living in an ancient  world [when, in a  Badaga Family], girls were NOT treated as EQUALS  and like in any other Indian Community, they were sort of discriminated.

This flawed thinking is very much against the rule of the land. The Indian constitution and present rules and regulations ensure that GIRLS GET EQUAL SHARE of the properties of their parents and ancestors [as BOYS]. Any discrimination in this respect is a criminal offence punishable under law.

But still many ‘self appointed’ and hapless  Badaga kap leaders and Gowdas, live under a false notion that all property is for males only. This cancerous notion which is destroying the  harmonious Badaga family system needs to be cut and CUT NOW. Unfortunately, the people mainly responsible for this ‘cancer’, you guessed it, are females – wives,mothers and grand mothers with ulterior motives.

It is high time we start treating this cancer of Warisu with all the contempt it deserves and cut it off before it destroys the very fabric that is  uniting the community.

More, with many examples, will follow….

Pa – Ha [ப-ஹ] change in Badaga

Pa -> – Ha [ப - ஹ] change in Badaga

Exclusive from Dr.R.K.Haldorai

The initial ha- ஹ - sound of the Badaga words confused its speakers many a time. Of course, there is a phonological point to be noted.

The present Badaga has a tendency to drop the initial ha- ஹ  -sound altogether. Due to this, the words once pronounced with h – sound are without that now. Hence those words which had initial ha- sound are now vowel initial sounds. ha sound is totally foreign to Dravidian languages. Therefore its use is equivalent to dropping the initial consonants altogether (Father Henry Heras 1936).
Example

  • hallu - allu -ஹல்லு - அல்லு  tooth
    haalu - aalu – ஹாலு – ஆலு milk
    hiTTu - iTTu – ஹிட்டு இட்டு - food
    hiiru - iiru - ஹிரு இரு-  to split
    hullu - ullu – ஹல்லு உல்லு grass
    huuyi - uuyi – ஹுய் ஊய் - tamarind
  • heTTe - eTTe – ஹெட்டே எட்டே - hen
    heegu - eegu - ஹேகு ஏகு -to tell
  • hoge - oge – ஹொகே ஒகெ - smoke
  • Hogu - Ogu – ஹோகு ஓகு - to go

As a special feature among Dravidian Languages Kannada language attested p – > h- change; a change which occurred quite early (Kulli 1976:304). This change is found in Badaga language too. This aspect has been adduced as an argument for settling Badaga language’s relationship with Kannada and even for deeming it a dialect of Kannada.
Since pa -> ha - change is common to Kannada and Badaga, scholars tried to fix the date of separation of Badaga language. On the basis that Badaga diverged from Kannada only after the old Kannada initial pa – , changed to middle and modern Kannada initial h – (Emeneau 1965 :18,19). They ignored the fact that in spite of attested p -> h – change , Badaga still has many words in use with initial p – ,many in basic in nature.

( E.g. paTTu -பட்டு  towel , payilu -பயிலு sprout, paTTe - பட்டேbark, paame - பாமே  story, payere - பேரே buttermilk, paaTTa koDe - பாட்டே கொடே umbrella of palmyra leaves)
The Kannada Encyclopaedia (KE) analyses this Badaga feature in brief and points out that all initial p – words are not changed into initial h – words in Badaga. Many initial p – words are in daily use in Badaga.

In Kannada p – > h – change began after 10th century. Hence Badaga might have diverged from Kannada prior to 10th century A.D.

The Kannada Encyclopaedia [KE] therefore assigns Badaga the status of an autonomous language (Nayak 1983 :412). Differing from Emeneau and others KE holds that Badaga might have diverged from Kannada even earlier than 10th century.

Kannada dictionary (Butcher 1983) recorded many initial p – and h – words, including some which are mere variants of the same words. Among these, Badaga language retained initial p – instead of initial h -.

Example

Kannada> puccu - huccu [puchchu huchchu] – புச்சு ஹுச்சு  (foolishness) : Badaga. puccu [puchchu]
Ka. paLi, haLi - பளி ஹளி (blame,rebuke ) : Ba. paLi
Ka. pusi, husi புசி ஹுசி (falsehood,lie ) : Ba. poy, puyyi -பொய்
Ka. pooTe, hooTe போட்டே ஹோட்டே (hollow of a tree) : Ba. pooTe  போட்டே(hollow)
Ka. pisuku, hisuku பிசுக்கு ஹிசுக்கு (to squeeze ) :Ba. பிசுக்கு -pisuku

In some cases Badaga substitutes s – for the h – found in Kannada words.

E.g. Ka. heDe (the expanded hood of a snake ) : Ba. seDe
Ka. huLi (sour ) : Ba. suLLe
Ka. hiju (to rend ) : Ba. suli
Ka. hore (neighbourhood, vicinity ) : Ba. saare

In few words PDr.(Proto Dravidian) p – changes into b – in Badaga.

E.g. Ka. pakkaLe (a kind of vessel) : Ba. baggare
Ka. paNi (stick, bat) : Ba. baNe
Ta. pambaram (top) : Ba. bombare
Ta. pakkam (shelter) : Ba. bakka

In a few places the initial p – and h – forms of the same word are use in Badaga but with
different meaning.

E.g. pace (green) : hacce (half-boiled, unripe, tender etc.,)
piri (to separate ) : hiri (to demolish)
piccu (to scatter) : hiccu ( to squirt )
poru (to endure ) : hour (to bear, carry or the head)
poTTu (simpleton ) : hoTTu (chaff, husk)

p – > h – is a share innovation found in Kannada and Badaga languages but with the following special features in Badaga.
1. Many initial p – words are in use in Badaga language and they are basic in nature
2. Unlike Kannada, all initial p- words are not changed into initial h – words in Badaga.
3. In a few places s – replaces h – in Badaga.
4. In a few places p – and h – form the same words are in different meanings in Badaga.

It is not correct, therefore to hold p – > h – change as a major criterion in settling the relationship of the Badaga language with Kannada.

Sutta Gassu Sandage…Badaga Recipes…

Gourmets’ worry over vanishing traditional foods, tastes

Article by Arun P Mathew, Times Of India | Nov 3, 2012

COIMBATORE: Ever heard of Sutta Gassu Sandage? It is one of the vanishing food items of badaga community of the Nilgiris. Taking part in a national seminar on ‘Heritage Foods of India’ at AJK College of Arts and Science here, senior chef H N Vijivan of Taj Vivanta Hotel in Coimbatore said the delicious badaga food item is made out of potato. Potatoes with skin are cooked over live charcoal, cleaned and salt and spices applied on it to make sutta gassu sandage.

According to him, there are over 20 exceptional varieties of food items of badagas and they need to be introduced to the gourmets across the world. Mouth-watering delicacies include ganjikke (boiled wheat pearls in an earthenware pot mixed with jaggery and coconut), eragi hittu (finger-millet balls made out of raggi flour, hot water and salt), badagaru koi uthakka (badaga chicken curry) and belle boungue sandage (roasted garlic chutney). Read the complete article here

Seen below on the left is ‘Thuppadittu – Ennayhittu’ and on the right is Eragi Hittu with Avaray Udakka and soppu’

Have you visited the page on Badaga Recipes ?

Badaga Songs…some of my favourites..

In a mood to listen to some fab Badaga Songs ['My Choice'] as you browse the posts…click on the pix and choose the song in the new window that opens up…

Badaga Songs

RAJMA, the great ‘GURU’

I have never had the fortune of meeting her so far. Only, the media reports about her receiving an award from the President of India, made me proud being a native of the Nilgiris & a Badaga. And take notice.

If you sit back and think of ONE teacher of our school  whose teachings & advise has made us what we are today, we feel so happy and grateful to have studied under her/him. This ‘guru’s’ teachings touch our lives in many ways.

When I wrote about her in my websites, the response from her students and others was huge and I realised ‘HOW ONE PERSON CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN SO MANY LIVES’.

That great person is Mrs.Rajamma from Kethorai Village, Rajma Mam to her students.

Recently when I received the following  email from her, appreciating the work on these websites, I felt humbled. I can feel how powerful her words and teachings would have been.

I take the liberty of publishing her letter to put on record my deep gratitude and I am sure she will remain a powerful influence in many more lives.

Dear JP,
 
Greetings. Hope my mail finds you in good health and cheers. Nice to read a lot of issues about our community in your web site.
 

“A lot of things go unquestioned..
Several questions go unanswered…
Many words go unsaid..
A number of words go unheard..
Some dreams are buried alive…”
 
WE CALL IT LIFE.
 
WHAT LIFE HAS  IN STORE FOR US TOMORROW , NO ONE KNOWS.

In this mysterious life , a very few people like you leave an ever lasting mark for their life time. You are doing a wonderful job. Keep it up.
 
Take care. My best wishes for you will remain always.
 
With regards,
 Rajma

http://www.thehindu.com/multimedia/dynamic/00162/15dcmypr_woman_powe_162738e.jpg?%20w=100

[photo courtesy - The Hindu]

JP adds :

It is said that, “If you educate a boy, you educate an individual but if you educate a girl, you educate an entire family.

Indeed, GIRL POWER IS GREAT POWER

BADAGA WORDS AND WRITINGS

BADAGA WORDS AND WRITINGS

Exclusive article by Dr. R.K.Haldorai

Family of languages is known as cognate languages, which means languages descended from common ancestor (origin). Because of the family relation, most of the words are formed in similar construction in cognate languages. Similarity is seen in grammar too.

The renowned Dravidian Etymological Dictionary, compiled by T.Burrow and M.B.Emeneau (available in internet too) gives the similar (cognate) words of Dravidian languages in one group. If we go through that we can notice the similarities of words within the family of languages. On etymological basis it grouped Dravidian words into 4572 entries. In that dictionary, to our dismay only thirteen Badaga words are included. Some twenty years back, I brought this to the notice of one of the editors, M.B.Emeneau. It is apparent that Badaga words are available for most of these entries. It is our ardent duty to collect words for these entries and make available with them. By this way one can find out the common origin of Badaga words. So, linguistically it is correct to uphold the common origin. The innovations and borrowings are to be dealt separately. Innovations are special features and in Badaga’s case the distinct language status is marked with its many such things. Usually language borrows vocabularies, mostly nouns; grammatical borrowing is near nil; verbs are borrowed very rarely.

The influence of neighboring languages on Badaga is to be seen with this background. And it is not right to conclude that a word or feature belongs to a dominant language when it is common in minor and dominant languages.

Basically language is spoken. Written language is nothing but the reflection of speech. Out of seven thousand languages spoken throughout the world only few hundred have scripts. On other hand, we cannot say that all the speakers of a language know its letters, which has written character. Among Dravidian languages only four are having their own scripts and Tulu and Kodagu adopted Kannada scripts. Anyhow script was vogue in Dravidian languages in their proto stage. That letter is called braami or tamizhi, from which letters of Indian languages, including Tamil and Kannada are derived. When we say Badaga is descended from Proto – Dravidian or Proto – South Dravidian, it is obvious that once it had letters. But because of long isolation in the Nilgiri plateau that had forgotten. Anyhow the words like bare (to write, letter, written document), baregaara (writer),  bareyagaara  (writer of our fate, god) , haNayal bare, nettiya bare (fate, written on ones fore – head), baretoDe (literacy), oodu (read), kallu (to study), ooleyakaara (messenger who brings documents written on palmyra leaf),etc., imply that writing was known to Badagas. Above all Badaga word muniya signifies as noble teacher and this is attested in one of the Badaga ballads. So, it is understood that teaching activities were also there and the word kallusu (make one to study, teach) makes known it.

( I must put on record my deep appreciation and gratitude to Dr.Haldorai for sending articles for publication in our websites. He is one of the original NATIVE researchers of our language and culture. Dr.Haldorai is being very proficient in Tamil also, some times I find some bias in his articles in favour of Tamil when he discusses certain issues. The difference between the articles of Dr.Haldorai and other ‘outsiders’ like Prof.Paul Hockings or M.B.Emeneau is that there is a definite authority and acceptance in what Haldorai says because he is a Badaga and obviously knows what he says. – Wg Cdr JP)

What a shame ?!

Badaga is an unique language…which still retains its old world charm. Unfortunately, the absence of a script has resulted in abuse of the language, what with ‘some learned and self proclaimed researchers’ claiming it to be a derivative of Tamil and others of Kannada.

It does not stop here, some ‘highly qualified/educated’ non – Badaga persons go as far as writing articles and books on Badaga language without understanding the basics or the fundamentals of this beautiful language. While we appreciate the interest and initiative shown by non Badagas to learn and write about Badaga, we feel angry when they give totally wrong information. Worse still, they have the audacity to ‘invite readers’ to ‘learn Badaga’. Shocking to say the least.

I came across a book in Tamil [courtesy - Saranavaraj] called “Arivom Badagar Mozhi’ அறிவோம் படகர் மொழி [ பழங்குடியினம் ] by Era.Jayalakshmi – published by Vijaya Pathippagam, Coimbatore.
It appears that Jayalakshmi’s only ‘qualification’ to write about Badaga is that she ‘found out’ in ” Badaga people’s spoken language, the greatness of old Tamil”  [ தமிழ் 'படுக' மக்கள் பேச்சு வழக்கில் தமிழின்  தொன்மையை கண்டறிந்தார் ] when she was serving  in the Ooty Municipality.
She starts off on a wrong note. In her preface, she claims that all Dravidian Languages are derivatives of Ancient Tamil. “Kannada, Telugu and Malayalam are languages that came out of the ‘blood’ of Tamil – கன்னடமும் களித்தெலுங்கும் கவியின் மலையாளமும் உன் உதிரத்தே உதித்தெழுந்து ஒன்று பல ஆயிடினும்..” she quotes Caldwel.

She goes on to say that like many Dravidian Languages ” BADAHAA - படஹா ” is only a spoken language. Note’ she does not even know that Badaga and Badagu - படக &  படுகு are never referred to as Badahaa. In her preface BADAHAA – “படஹா” is mentioned atleast eight times with quotation marks.

Here are some bloomers – deliberate or otherwise :-

In the book, what is your name [உன் பெயர் என்ன?] is given as: -
1.Enna eraru ena  இன்ன எசரு என? -  what is your name - உன் பெயர் என்ன? (This is the very first sentence in the book).
[It should have been :- Ninna hesaru yena - நின்ன ஹெசரு ஏன?]
2.uralvai esaru ena உறல்வை எசரு என? – what is mother’s name – அம்மாவின் பெயர் என்ன?
[should have been - Awwaiya hesaru yena - அவ்வைய ஹெசரு ஏன?]
3.Enaga paadi ariye – எனக பாடி அறியே -  I donot know how to sing – எனக்கு பாட தெரியாது
[should have been - Na kadai hegi ariye - ந கதை ஹேகி அறியே]

There are too many mistakes, all most in every page, to elaborate . In one word this book is PATHETIC.

The author, it appears, has never heard of proof reading or the Badaga words in the book are either meaningless or distorted. The icing on the cake is that she dedicates her book to those ‘researchers of languages -மொழி ஆராய்ச்சி  அறிஞர்கள் ‘.

It is high time, R.Lakshmi withdraws this book, consults a Badaga and do a proper proof reading and then dare to publish.

What do you do, laugh or cry??

[My request to Badaga Association in Coimbatore is, please contact/ visit the publishers Vijaya Pathippagam,20, Raja Street, Coimbatore -641001 phoen # 0422-2382614 / 2385614 [email -vijayapathippagam2007gmail.com], since the author’s email or address/contact numbers are not given, and ask them to take corrective steps].

****************

Prabhakar [email ; writerprabhakar@gmail.com] comments :

While the article by the particular author/publication needs to be condemned, I do not quite agree with the contention that Badaga is not a derivative of Tamil or Kannada. Can the administrator of this website speak an entire sentence in Badagu without using a word of Kannada or Tamil??? It is high time that we realized that Badaga is indeed a derivative /mixture of Kannada and Tamil. Realization is enlightenment. Moroever there is no ‘shame’ involved in it. I am a proud Badaga who takes pride in his unique culture and tradition, but am equally aware that my language is a unique mix of two other languages. If someone were to deny it then it would mean that Badaga precedes these two languages. If it has indeed preceded these two languages than it would have definitely had a script. So let us stop romanticising the origins of our language and accept reality.

Hello Prabhakar,

I am surprised and saddened by your conviction and contentions. I am not sure whether you have read my articles/posts/pages on our language. Well, I am convinced that Badaga is a separate language by itself – without a script [like so many other spoken languages]. While there is no denying the fact that Badaga and old (haliya) Kannada resemble a lot and of late there is great Tamil influence. This is probably, due to the fact, we belong to Tamil Nadu and many of us have studied in Tamil medium schools. Why Badaga, without a script, could not have preceded Kannada or Tamil, is not the question, but could it not have co- existed with Sen Tamizh – old Tamil and Haliya Kannada??

I did my schooling in Rao Bahadur Board High School, Hubbathalai where the medium of instruction was Tamil. I love Tamil and can boast, at the cost of modesty, that I was ranked sixth in the entire Tamil Nadu, Manavar Mandram examinations of 1963-64. Hence can read and write Tamil very well. I can’t say the same about Kannada.If you read my articles on Badaga Language, there is a lot of ref to Badaga in the Tamil Epics.

Incidentally Mrs.R.Jaylakshmi says in her book that Badaga is a ‘child’ of Tamil and goes on to quote that ‘Odhu -study’ is the same as in Sen Tamizh – Odhamal orunaalum irrukka vendaam -ஓதாமல் ஒருநாளும் இறுக்க வேண்டாம்’

By the way, in Badaga we say ‘bil kul’ for ‘definitely’ like “bilkul beda – definitely don’t want“. Bilkul is a Sanskrit word. Can we say that Badaga is a derivative of Sanskrit? Ungara and Majjige mean finger ring and butter milk in Telugu and Badaga. Is Badaga a derivative of Telugu?

Why are we still have the mind set to blindly accept what others have mentioned about our language or for that matter, even about our origin that we migrated from Mysore.

I notice that you have mentioned that you are a National award winning Journalist. Like to read your articles and if possible, reproduce them in my websites.

- Wg Cdr JP

Sixty plus and Going Strong

(Translated from the original in Chinese)
 
There are 1000-year old trees in the mountain, but not many 100 year-old people…
At the most, you live until 100 years old (only 1 in 100,000).
If you live until 90, you only have 30 years.
If you live until 80, you only have 20 years.
Because you don’t have many years to live, and you can’t take along things when you go, you don’t have to be too thrifty.
Spend the money that should be spent, enjoy what should be enjoyed, donate what you are able to donate, but don’t leave all to your children or grandchildren, for you don’t want them to become parasites.
Don’t worry about what will happen after you are gone, because when you return to dust, you will feel nothing about praises or criticisms.
Don’t worry too much about your children for children will have their own destiny and find their own way. Don’t be your children’s slave.
Don’t expect too much from your children. Caring children, though caring, would be too busy with their jobs and commitments to render any help.
Uncaring children may fight over your assets even when you are still alive, and wish for your early demise so they can inherit your properties.
Your children take for granted that they are rightful heirs to your wealth; but you have no claims to their money.
60-year old like you, don’t trade in your health for wealth anymore; Because your money may not be able to buy your health.
When to stop making money, and how much is enough (hundred thousand, million, ten million)?
Out of thousand hectares of good farm land, you can only consume three quarts (of rice) daily; out of a thousand of mansions, you only need eight square meters of space to rest at night.
So as long as you have enough food and enough money to spend, that is good enough.
So you should live happily. Every family has its own problems.
Just do not compare with others for fame and social status and see whose children are doing better, etc. but challenge others for happiness, health and longevity…
Don’t worry about things that you can’t change because it does not help, and it may spoil your health.
You have to create your own well-being and find your own happiness; As long as you are in good mood, think about happy things, do happy things daily and have fun in doing, then you will pass your time happily every day.
One day passes, you will lose one day; One day passes with happiness, and then you gain one day.
In good spirit, sickness will cure; in happy spirit, sickness will cure fast; in good and happy spirit; sickness will never come.
With good mood, suitable amount of exercise, always in the sun, variety of foods, reasonable amount of vitamin and mineral intake, hopefully you will live another 20 or 30 years of healthy life.
Above all learn to cherish the GOODNESS around…and FRIENDS…all friends make you feel young and “wanted”…without them you are surely to feel lost!!!
(Please share this with all your friends who are 60 plus and those who will be 60 plus some time soon).

[recd as a fwd email]

Dementia


Exercise for the brain

Below is a very private way to gauge how your memory compares to the last test. Some may think it is too easy but the ones with memory problems may have difficulty. Take the test presented here to determine if you’re losing it or not. The spaces below are so you don’t see the answers until you’ve made your answer.

OK, relax, clear your mind, breathe in, breathe out… and begin.

1. What do you put in a toaster?

 

 

 

 

 

Answer :You jumped to the answer thinking, easy, it is toast but the answer is Bread . If you said ‘toast’ ,give up now and do something else..

Try not to hurt yourself. If you said, bread, go to Question 2.

2. Say ‘silk’ five times. Now spell ‘silk..’ What do cows drink?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: Have you seen a cow drinking ? Cows drink water. If you said ‘milk,’ don’t attempt the next question. Your brain is over-stressed and may even overheat.. Content yourself with reading a more appropriate literature such as Auto World. However, if you said ‘water’, proceed to question 3.

3. If a red house is made from red bricks and a blue house is made from blue bricks and a pink house is made from pink bricks and a black house is made from black bricks, what is a green house made from?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: Greenhouses are made from glass. If you said ‘green bricks,’ why are you still reading these??? If you said ‘glass,’ go on to Question 4.

4.It’s twenty years ago, and a plane is flying at 20,000 feet over Germany (If you will recall, Germany at the time was politically divided into West Germany and East Germany ). Anyway, during the flight, two engines fail. The pilot, realizing that the last remaining engine is also failing, decides on a crash landing procedure. Unfortunately the engine fails before he can do so and the plane fatally crashes smack in the middle of ‘no man’s land’ between East Germany ! ! And West Germany … Where would you bury the survivors? East Germany , West Germany , Or no man’s land’?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: You don’t bury ‘survivors’. If you said ANYTHING else, you’re a dunce and you must stop. If you said, ‘You don’t bury survivors’, proceed to the next question.

5. Without using a calculator, here’s the next question – You’re driving a bus from Sydney to Brisbane

In Sydney , 17 people get on the bus.
In Hornsby , 6 people get off the bus and 9 people get on.
In Kempsey , 2 people get off and 4 get on.
In Coffs Harbour , 11 people get off and 16 people get on.
In Byron Bay , 3 people get off and 5 people get on.
In Tweed Heads, 6 people get off and 3 get on.
You then arrive at Brisbane ..

Without scrolling back to review, how old is the bus driver?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: Don’t you remember who was driving the bus??!!

If you pass this along to your friends, pray they do better than you.

Magic square…??!!

You must have heard of the great mathematician Ramanujam’s Magic Square given below :

You add up any row, column, diagonal, or ‘four adjacent squares’, you will get 139.

The beauty is that the first row gives his Date Of Birth – 22 Dec 1887.

Well, inspired by this I made a magic square with my DOB 24 Apr 1948

Where the addition of the four numbers in each row, column, four corners, diagonal or small squares of adjacent numbers add upto 95.

If you look closely on the above two squares, you can realise that you can easily ‘crack this code’ and MAKE A MAGIC SQUARE with your DOB – where the four numbers will add upto a specific number.

Got it ? If you are too lazy to make your own magic square, send your DOB to me, I will make the magic square. You will find my email id elsewhere on this page.

Happy Birthday, mom!

We would come home at Hubbathalai and to your room [nadu roomu -centre room, as we call it]…

Your face would brighten up seeing me, “bandu buttaya- you have come” you would say with a smile, reclining from the bed.

Mrs.Idyamma Bellie Gowder

[2-9-1912---13-7-2011]

“Harachu- bless me” I would say, bowing my head. You would place both your hands on my head and bless me with those beautiful words ” ondu nooru saavira aagili, endhendhu somi ninaga olliya haracha kottu, sogava kottu barali – let one become a hundred thousands..may God give you good health and happiness…”

Then with a faint smile,  and holding your hands, I would tell you,”Happy Birthday, mom..endhu ninna huttidha barasha, ardhaya – do you know that today is your birthday ?”

You would act surprised, ” athaya… is it so?…aesu barasha aathu – how many years?… ennu aesu kaala ebbadhu- how many more years to stay?”

We, all your children, grand children and great grand children along with other relatives, would have celebrated your 100th Birthday in grand style.

Mom, you chose to leave us just a year short of a century.

Gone to ‘another’ world but never forgotten.

But wherever you are, we know, your blessings are with us always.

You were and are the inspiration for everything.

We miss you, mom !

Traditions kept alive by these brave Badaga ladies

What is extremely gratifying and gives a lot of happiness is see some brave – hearts Badaga ladies wearing traditional Badaga Jewellery. One such lady is Subbi Hethe of Thogalatty [near Kattabettu] with the mookkuthi and kivi chinna [read all about Badaga Jewellery here]. I had the pleasure of meeting her at Honneri a couple of days back..

Thank you, Subbi Hethe

Remembering Rao Bahadur Ari Gowder

Today, 28-6-2014 is the 43rd Death Anniversary of Ari Gowda

Bowing our heads in silent reverence and respect for all that he had done to  the family, society and the nation !

Ari Gowderrbhbag.jpg

ARI GOWDA – a great Indian, a great Badaga

28-6-2014 is the 43rd Death Anniversary of Ari Gowda

Bowing our heads in silent reverence and respect for all that he had done to our community…so that we can hold our heads high !
Nanjan Adja Gowder [ananjagowder@gmail.com] writes to ask, ” can you please enumerate some of the good things that Ari Gowder has done for the BADAGA Community? I would welcome that, not just for me but for the whole Badaga Community “
It is my privilege and honour to mention/reproduce the great service done by Ari Gowda to the society in general and Badagas in particular – Wg. Cdr JP

Ari Gowderrbhbag.jpgAri Gowder2Ari Gauda

[above - text] From the book ” A BADAGA – ENGLISH DICTIONARY ” by Prof.Paul Hockings and Christiane Pilot-Raichoor

Rao Bahadur H.B.Ari Gowder, the first Badaga graduate, first Badaga M.L.C & M.L.A for a long time who had brought many reforms in/to Badaga Community including ‘prohibition’ (no alcohol - kudi) to Nilgiris in British days itself. Ari Gowder lead the Indian contigent (yes, “INDIAN CONTIGENT) to World Scouts Jumboree held in Europe in the 1930s.

Ari Gowder was associated with the Nilgiri Mountain Railways, now an UN Heritage,  right from the time this great and beautiful track was established in early 1900s till his death in 1971. In fact his father Rao Bahadur H.J.Bellie Gowder was contracted by the British to lay the mountain railway from Mettupalayam to Ooty. Also, probably, Bellie Gowder and Ari Gowder are the only father -son duo who were conferred with Rao Bahadur title in India, though Ari Gowder hardly used the title being a great nationalist.

He was not associated with any political party  but was a true representative of the people, a powerful orator and  welfare minded  social reformer’ – says A.Kari Gowder ["Prongadu Seeme Welfare Association "] in his booklet published in  May 2006.                                          AG1 bridge                        

Ari Gowder BridgeHe was the President of the Nilgiris District board in 1930s and 1940s and carried out a lot of welfare measures for the upliftment of the residents of the hill district, mainly tribals in those days. To remember his contribution to the society, the bridge connecting Tamil Nadu [then Madras] state and Karnataka [then Mysore] state, built in 1936, is named ARI GOWDER bridge.

Ari Gowder was listed as one of the famous leaders of South East Asia - Who’s who in India, Burma & Ceylon. Who’s Who Publishers. 1940. p. 681.

H. B. Ari Gowder’s name figures in the Famous Madras Christian College Alumni list along with people like Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

Being a great philanthropist he had done a lot for the betterment of Badagas. He was the one who established Nilgiri Co-Op Marketing Society at Ooty, to save the small farmers-especially Badagas- from the exploits of middlemen & traders at Mandis in Mettupalayam. He was the President of NCMS for more than 30 years, till his death and NCMS was considered one of the best co-op societies in India during his days. By way of acknowledging his significant contribution his bust was unveiled on May 25, 1987, in the multi-purpose hall of the NCMS.
Since he donated the land, the road in front of Mambalam Railway Station in Chennai (Madras) is named after him (known as Arya Gowder Street). Both were held in great esteem and considered as the ‘ Uncrowned King ‘ of Nakku Betta by Badagas.
Rao Bahadur H.BAri Gowder is known to have sent his assistant HAIKA MATHI in 1940s and 1950s to all over the Nakku Betta to know about problems of Badagas, but,unfortunately there are no written records available / traceable
Ari Gowda is held in great esteem and was considered as the ‘ Uncrowned King ‘ of Nakku Betta by Badagas. In fact, May 15th,  Badaga Day is celebrated  as Ari Gowder day

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See this entry in Wekipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._B._Ari_Gowder

hbag

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The story of Ariya Gowda

by Sriram V [The Hindu - Chennai, May 1, 2012]

Ari Gowder was President of the Backward Classes League and leaned towards the Justice Party

The chances of anyone travelling down Ariya Gowda Road in West Mambalam, and stopping to wonder about the identity of the man who gave the thoroughfare its name, are slim.

For when you are on Ariya Gowda Road, you are focused on getting out of the road alive, given its traffic.

He was not Ariya Gowda. He was HB Ari Gowder, a great visionary and leader of the Badaga community of the Nilgiris. And his life, as gleaned from various sources, including a 1935 Who’s Who and the internet, makes for interesting reading. Rao Bahadur Hubbathalai J Bellie Gowder, made his fortune in laying the tracks of the Nilgiri Mountain Railway, which was completed in 1908.

His wealth made him a leading member of his community, and his clansmen came to him for advice on several issues. Bellie Gowder founded a free school in his native village, Hubbathalai, an institution that still functions. He passed away in 1935. Bellie Gowder’s son, Ari, was born in 1893. His father ensured that he was educated in the modern sense and he graduated from Madras Christian College.

Though he was to consider himself a contractor and a planter, it was in politics and social uplift that Ari Gowder was to make a mark. In 1923, he became the first Badaga to be elected to the Madras Legislative Council of which he was a member until 1934. In the 1940s, he was elected to the Madras Legislative Assembly.

When the Rajaji government introduced Prohibition in 1937, he led the challenge of enforcing it in the Nilgiris, of which area he was also the first non-official to become District Board President. Ari Gowder was also active in the Scouts Movement. Another contribution of his was the establishment of the Nilgiris Cooperative Marketing Society, which eliminated the stranglehold middlemen had over the simple mountain people.

He was also a Director of the Badaga Land Mortgage Bank. While the sympathies of most of his community lay with the Congress, Ari Gowder, given that he was President of the Backward Classes League, leaned more towards the Justice Party, which was active till the 1930s. That probably explains the road in Mambalam being named after him.

Neighbouring Theyagaroya Nagar or T Nagar, developed in the 1920s when the Justice Party was in power and most of the roads, parks and streets there are named after its leaders.

Legend also has it that a large chunk of land adjoining the Mambalam Railway Station was his, which he donated for developmental work. Like his father, Ari Gowder too received the title of Rao Bahadur from the British Government, in 1943.

In 1946, Ari Gowder was defeated in the Assembly elections. But in 1952 he contested successfully as an independent. He was to remain an independent for the rest of his career.

He passed away in 1971. How did Ari Gowder Road morph into Ariya Gowda Road? And should it not be just Ari Road?

“Abharanji” – a novel worth reading!

When ‘Poompaavai‘, a writer who has published novels in Tamil, sent me an email mentioning that she has high regards for the Baduga people and their culture; and that she was writing a ‘a romantic fiction, accompanied with the back drop of Badaga culture and traditions‘. And hoped that  ‘the love and respect she has for Badagas to be reflected in her book in a positive way‘, I was curious.

Abharanji 001 (2)

By the way, if I am not mistaken, Sahitya Akademi Award winner Mrs.Rajam Krishnan’s Tamil novel - குறிஞ்சித் தேன் KURINJI THEN was the first one to be based on Badaga people.

To my pleasant surprise she suggested that I write a ‘Forward -அணிந்துரை ‘ and sent me a pre- release/proof copy of the novel called “ABHARANJI - a love story that touches the heart - அபரஞ்சி [இதயத்தை வருடும் காதல் கதை] 

Since, unfortunately, many articles on Badagas do not portray their customs and culture in a positive way, I was a little apprehensive. Though  not, through and through, about Badagas,  Poompaavai’s novel reflects many aspects of Badaga life in a nice and positive way.

And in my ‘forward’ I wrote,

‘தமிழ்நாட்டின் கோடை வாசஸ்தலமான நீலகிரி மலைகளின் மடியில், இயற்கையின்  எழிலில் ஆயிரம் ஆயிரம் ஆண்டுகளாக தங்கள் பாரம்பரைத்தையும், பண்பாடுகளையும் பாதுகாத்து, கலாச்சாரத்தையும் கட்டுப்பாடுகளையும் காப்பாற்றி வரும் ஓர் பழங்குடி, படகர் சமுதாயம். விருந்தோம்பலுக்கு பெயர் பெற்ற இவர்கள், எளிமையில் இனிமை காண்பவர்கள்.
தங்கள் வாழ்க்கை முறை அழிந்து போய்விட கூடாது என்பதற்காக மற்ற சாதிகளோடு கல்யாணம் செய்ய தயங்கும் சமுதாயம்.
நீலகிரி மலைகளை தாண்டி படகர் இன மக்களை பற்றி அதிகம் தெரிவதில்லை. தெரிந்தவையும் அறைகுறையே. படகர் இன மக்களின் அரிய சில சம்பிராயங்களை, வாழ்க்கைமுறைகளை பற்றி வெளி உலகத்திற்கு அழகாக படம் பிடித்து காட்டுகின்றார் ‘பூம்பாவை’ தான் நாவலின் மூலம்’. 
I had pointed out some corrections as far as the exact way some words are spoken by the Badagas [like hatti- ஹட்டி  instead of haththi - ஹத்தி ]. Sadly, the publishers have overlooked the same in the final print.
Poompaavai’s novel, apart from being a romantic love story, also touches on some intimate but highly complicate relationship/feelings between parents and a beautiful daughter; also, the ever changing society refusing to accept ‘changes’ within itself etc etc.
001 (2)
A powerful love story that is bound to touch the reader’s heart as well as the mind!
This novel is priced at Rs.70/- and published by SHANKAR PATHIPPAGAM, Villivaakkam, Chennai -600049 [ ph # 26502086]

 

 

Make the Nilgiris a much NICER place

Dharmalingam Venugopal [Nilgiri Documentation Centre] needs no introduction. His commitment to uphold the importance of heritage and history of our district,The Nilgiris, is well known [The Nilgiri Documentation Centre at Kannerimukku is an example]. His concern about the environmental degradation of ‘Nakku Betta’ [the Badaga name for the Nilgiris]is well known and has pushed him to organise a meeting on the World Environment Day, 5-6-2014. Here is a summary of what transpired at the meeting in his own words. All of us should join hands with DV and make the Nilgiris what it is meant to be. A nature’s gift to mankindWg Cdr JP

Nilgiri Blueprint

 The Nilgiri Blueprint initiative of the Nilgiri Documentation Centre  got off to a promising start on World Environment Day with bold, innovative and time bound proposals. Given the economic, ecological and heritage significance of the Nilgiris, a comprehensive Master Plan with a horizon of five to ten years should be prepared with a Negative List of activities harmful to the already fragile hill district. This means the district should be declared as

Environmentally Sensitive Zone by the Ministry of Environment and Forests  as in the case of other hill stations such as Mount Abu, Pachmarhi and Mahabaleshwer Panchgani.

Given the antiquity, continuity and variety of plant, animal and human life, the entire Nilgiris should be declared a Heritage Hill District. This is possible under Section 37 of Biological Diversity Act, 2002 (BDA) under which the State Government in consultation with local bodies may notify in the official gazette, areas of biodiversity importance as Biodiversity Heritage Sites (BHS). The State Government in consultation with the Central Government can also frame rules for the management and conservation of BHS.

The unabated construction boom by promoters from the plains without regard to the environmental norms should be put an end to before the damage becomes irreversible.  If a total ban may not be feasible, a moratorium can be considered for about five years on all commercial and residential constructions with due exceptions given to local needs.  This is bound to cool the current construction boom and provide time for instituting mitigative and adaptive measures in the future. Given the high degree of use of fertilizers and pesticides in the current  farming practices,  people should incentivized to move towards organic farming which is suitable to the hills.

Given the unparalleled tourist inflow into the Nilgiris round the year and the possibility of the inflow increasing in the future, a massive solid waste management plan is imperative for district. Land must be acquired at any cost for the purpose. Degraded forest land can also be considered. A Tourism Betterment Levy can be collected from visitors  at the point of stay or entry into public places like the Garden or the Lake to partly meet the cost of waste management.

The towns of Ooty, Coonoor, Gudalur and Kotagiri are no more hill stations but Mountain Cities with heavy vehicular traffic. Infrastructures in the form of flyovers, over bridges and tunnels are imminent requirements.

Given that the Nilgiris attracts various classes of tourists including from abroad, tourism promotion should also be intellectually and aesthetically entertaining. Events like Book Fairs, Art, Literary and Heritage shows should be promoted. Colonial  history of the district can be showcased profitably. The educational and service institutions must be involved in this. The priorities of the Hill Area Development Programme should be suitably reoriented to suit the emerging priorities of the district.

Further suggestions and discussions are welcome to  the newly created website blueprint@nilgiridocumentation.org  

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12112 009aLet us make the world — Greener

Bisons